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REPORT ON A PLAN FOR THE 
LOCATION OF FIREH0USE3 IN SAN FRANCISCO 



AUGUST 1952 



SAN FRANCISCO DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING 



*35X 



697406 






CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING 

100 LARKIN STREET • CIVIC CENTER • SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 



August 28, 1952 



TO THE PERSONS RECEIVING THIS REPORT: 



In cooperation with the Fire Department, the 
Department of City Planning ha3 prepared the 
attached Report on the Location nf Firehouse3 in 
San Francisco, which is transmitted for your 
information. 



This plan has been prepared as an element of 
the Land Use Section of the Master Plan of the 
City and County of San Francisco. It will also 
serve as a sound basis for the general program 
of firehouse construction and rehabilitation 
currently under consideration by officials of 
the City and County. 

The City Planning Commission will hold a 
public hearing on October 9, 1952, as required by 
Section 116 of the Charter, prior to offically 
adopting the plan. 



Any comments 
be welcomed. 



you may have on the plan will 



Very truly yours, 




Paul Oppermann 
Director of Planning 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Elmer E, Robinson, Mayor 



Byron Arnold 
George J. Christopher 
Harrld S. Dobbs 
John J. Ferdon 
Marvin Lewis 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
Dewey Mead, President 



Chester R. MacPhee 

Edward T. Mancuso 

Francis McCarty 

Patrick J. McMurray 

John J. Sullivan 



Walter Leonetti 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Fire Commission 

Leo H. Shapiro, President 

Robert H. Schaefer 
Edward P. Walsh, Chief Engineer 
Thomas W, McCarthy, Secretary 

DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING 

City Planning Commission 



Ernest E. Williams, President 
Mrs. Eugene Prince, Vice-President 
William D. Kilduff 

Ex Officio Members 



Harold T. Lopez 
Elmer J. Towle 



Thomas A, Brooks, Chief Administrative Officer 

B. A. Devine, Designated Deputy 

for James H. Turner, Manager of Utilities 

Paul Oppermann, Director of Planning 

Bryant Hall, Principal City Planner 

Joseph Mignola, Jr., Secretary 



Chiefs of Division 



Land Planning 
Redevelopment Planning 
Project Planning 
Zoning 



James R. McCarthy 

George Duggar 

Frank Lombardi 

Elwood M. Gill 



The "Report on a Plan for the Location of Firehouses in 

San Francisco" was prepared by the Land Planning Division 

under the direction of James R. McCarthy 

with the assistance of James Keilty. 



August 1952 




CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING 

100 LARKIN STREET • CIVIC CENTER • SAN FRANCISCO 2. CALIFORNIA 



August 11, 1952 



Mr. Edward P. Walsh, Chief Engineer 
San Francisco Fire Department 
2 City Hall 
San Francisco 2 



Location of Firehouses 



Dear Chief Walsh: 



It is with pleasure that I transmit to you 
this Report on a Plan for the Location of Firehouses 
in San Francisco. 

This study has been carried out in order to 
establish in the Master Plan a plan for a system of 
firehouses that will meet current and foreseeable fu- 
ture needs and that can serve as a basis for the imme- 
diate replacement program contemplated by your depart- 
me nt , 

This report has been prepared as a technical 
study by the staff of the Department of City Planning 
for review by you and your staff, the Fire Commission, 
the Mayor and other public agencies and citizen groups. 
Subsequently the City Planning Commission will hold a 
public hearing, according to its responsibilities under 
Section 116 of the Charter, and will then consider the 
plan, and any modification resulting from public review, 
for adoption as a part of the Master Plan. 

The cooperation afforded by you and Chief 
Rudolf Schubert during the course of this study is very 
much appreciated. 

Very truly yours, 

™*^ (J l> y^y^*~— 

Paul Oppermann 
Director of Planning 



CONTENTS 



Letter of Transmittal 
Contents 

Summary of Conclusions and Recommendations 1 

Introduction: Purpose of this Report 3 

I Organization of the Fire Department 6 

II Existing Firehouses 9 

III Principles applied to the Location 

of New Firehouses 16 

IV Recommended Plan for the Location of Firehouses 23 



PLATES 

I Existing Firehouses - 1952 preceding page 9 

II Proposed Locations of Firehouses preceding page 23 



TABLES 

I Existing Firehouses, Company numbers, 

location, date of construction and 

recommendation in the Vensano report - 1951 14 

II New Firehouse Sites Recommended 35 

III Existing Firehouse Sites Recommended for 

Abandonment, and Appraised Value of Land 37 



SUMMARY OF CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

Conclusion a ; 

• San Francisco is presently covered by a fire protection 
system operating out of 52 firehouses, each of which serves 
not only its immediately adjacent area but any part of the 
city when necessary, 

, Of the 52 firehouses serving the city 23 are structurally 
unsafe and must be abandoned. 

• The great majority of the firehouses in the city are obso- 
lete in design and equipment or are in need of repair. The 
physical condition of most firehouses is poor and unsightly 
and the interior facilities are crowded and obsolete. 

• Sites of many firehouses In the city are suited in size and 
location only to the requirements of a horse-drawn system of 
fire-fighting and are inappropriate for present fire-fighting 
me tho ds « 

• In general, firehouses should be distributed throughout the 
city so that each firehouse has a primary service area ex- 
tending within a radius of one-half mile. This spacing 
should vary in relation to population densities, building 
Intensities and types of construction, the pattern of traf- 
ficways, and with the relative degree of fire-hazard. 



1. 



, Firehouses should be located on streets clcse to and lead- 
ing Into major or secondary thoroughfares, 

• Flrehouses should be so located that no topographic barrisrs 
require time-consuming detours within the primary service 
area of each fire house. 

• Flrehouses should be located in or near areas of relatively 
high population densities or adjacent te commercial areas 
where the normal activity on the streets is greater than 
that occurring on a residential access street in a low-den- 
sity area, 

• Firehousa- Bites should be of sufficient size to allow pro- 
vision of adequate sleeping, eating, and recreational space 
for the toi-al number of men to be housed at any one time, 

Reco mmondations: 



That an ultimate system of 46 flrehouses be established to 

serve San Francisco, 

That new sites be acquired for 20 flrehouses. (Four now sites 

are already ownod). 

That 29 existing sites be abandoned. 

That 22 sites be retained and continued in use. Some of 

these should be expanded in size. 

That available vacant sites be acquired in the first stage 

of the program for effectuating this location plan. 



2. 



INTRODUCTION: PURPOSE OF THIS REPORT 

On two occasions in the past eleven years studies have been made 
of the physical condition of the firehouses of San Francisco. The 
first of these reports, submitted in 1940, was by Mr. Harold Engle, 
consulting engineer of the Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific. 
The mere recent investigation and report on r, A Survey of the Fire 
Houses of San Francisco" was made in 1951 by Mr. H. C. Vensano, con- 
sulting engineer and former Director of Public Works for San Fran- 
cisco, at the request of Chief Engineer Edward P. Walsh of the Fire 
Department . 

Both of these reports recommended immediate replacement of a 
number of firehouses and a thoroughgoing rehabilitation of the ma- 
jority of those that were to be continued in use. Although the 
Engle report had the very important effect of improving the design 
of new structures, the intervening war years made it unfeasible to 
undertake the large-scale replacement of the firehouse system that 
was necessary. As a result, only two firehouses have been built 
since 1940 and a third is under construction. Thus the system re- 
ported on by Mr. Vensano in 1951 is, in large measure, the same as 
that covered by Mr. Engle eleven years earlier, except that the fa- 
cilities are more in need of replacement and rehabilitation in pro- 
portion to the time elapsed. 
Revision of Firehouse System Needed 

Publication of the Vensano report and recommendations brought 
forcefully to light the dangerous condition of many of the firehouse 

3. 



facilities in San Francisco. On the basis of this report the Fire 
Department began immediately to think in terms of developing a pro- 
gram for the replacement and relocation of all but the most recently 
constructed firehouses in a citywide pattern that would conform to 
modern standards of firehouse coverage. As 24 of the existing fire- 
houses have been recommended for immediate abandonment, it is par- 
ticularly appropriate to prepare a plan for the broad over-all revi- 
sion of the firehouse system at this time. In addition, only a very 
few of the existing firehouses are sufficiently modern and of such 
recent construction that their usefulness in the system will extend 
beyond the next ten years, the time period established by the Fire 
Department for the ultimate replacement of the present system. 
Relation to the Master Plan 

The Department of City Planning is responsible for the prepara- 
tion and maintenance of the Master Plan, a general plan to guide the 
improvement and future development of the physical environment of the 
city. Included in the scope of the Master Plan is the location, 
character, and extent of public grounds, buildings and facilities. 
When first adopted in 1945 the Master Plan contained no provisions 
for new firehouses or relocation cr abandonment of then existing 
firehouse sites, for no specific study had as yet been given to fire- 
house requirements. 

This report is the result of a special study made for the pur- 
pose of preparing a plan to guide firehouse location which will meet 
the operating requirements of the Fire Department and which will also 
be in harmony with related public service facilities and with all 
other land uses. 

4. 



This report is the first in a series dealing with the location 
of public facilities in San Francisco and presents a particular plan 
that can be incorporated into the Master Plan. This study has been 
made in consultation and cooperation with the Fire Department. The 
siting of firehouses recommended in the plan has been done with the 
guidance of the Fire Department from the standpoint of its operating 
requirements, and by the Department of City Planning from the stand- 
point of land use and trafficways relationships. 



5. 



I ORGANIZATION OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Fire Department of the City and County of San Francisco is 
organized under what might be termed the American Plan to distinguish 
it from its European counterpart. In Europe all fire fighting equip- 
ment and men are housed in a few central locations. In Paris, for 
example, there are only six stations to serve the entire city with 
its population of almost three million. On the other hand, the typi- 
cal United States city distributes its fire fighting facilities 
widely over the entire city in an effort to give all areas an equal 
amount of protection, based on the amount of time required to reach 
any part of the city in answering a call. San Francisco, even though 
it is not a typically sprawling American city, but, rather, a compact 
area of relatively high population density, maintains the American 
type system and presently operates 52 firehouses. 
Administrative Organization 

The Fire Department has divided the city into three divisions 
and eleven battalions. The First Division, which contains three 
battalions, comprises the central business, commercial and industrial 
areas both north and south of Market Street, and stretches from the 
waterfront on the east to Octavia Street on the west north of Market 
Street, and from the waterfront to Sixth Street couth of Market 
Street. These two boundaries are joined via Golden Gate Avenue from 
Octavia Street to Market and Sixth Streets. The Second Division, 
made up of four battalions numbered 4 to 7, divides the city approx- 
imately in half and contains virtually all of Golden Gate Park, all 

6. 



of the Richmond, Marina, Western Addition and Buena Vista community 
areas, the northernmost part of the Mission and Potrero community 
areas and the western part of the South-of -Market area. 

The remainder of the city — the Sunset, West of Twin Peaks, Mis- 
sion, Outer Mission and Bayshore community areas--are all contained 
in Division Three, comprising four battalions numbered 6 to 11. 

In addition San Francisco has one company not stationed within 
the city limits. This is the company that services the San Fran- 
cisco international Airport in San Matec County. The Airport com- 
pany is given the designation "X ; '. 

The division and battalion boundaries are set primarily for ad- 
ministrative convenience and to give each division chief and battal- 
ion chief approximately the same degree of responsibility. The com- 
panies themselves, however, are not limited to servicing any partic- 
ular area of the city. Rather, the department acts as a unit over 
the entire city and equipment may be called from any company to as- 
sist at a fire anywhere within the city. When large fires occur, 
equipment and men from adjacent or outlying areas may be brought in 
to man stations where most or all of the equipment is in use. 

The Fire Chief is charged with superintending the extinguish- 
ment of fires, and at such times he exercises supreme command over 
all the department members on duty. The Chief is also executive 
head of the department, serving under the three-man board of fire 
commissioners. 

The Fire Chief is en continuous twenty -four hour duty, assist- 
ant chiefs are on platoon duty with regular assignments, and battal- 
ion chiefs are responsible for the operation of their companies. 

7. 



Battalion chiefs also serve as fire wardens and are required to en- 
force fire protective ordinances in assigned districts. 

A battalion is composed of a number of engine and truck compa- 
nies and such special equipment and corps as salvage corps, rescue 
squads and utility squads. In each battalion there are either four 
or five firebcuses containing either a single company or a combina- 
tion of truck and engine companies, as well as one or more of the 
special corps. 
Company Organization 

Company strength varies, with one officer and five or six men 
in the majority of engine and truck companies, salvage corps, and 
rescue squads. A tank wagon has two men assigned to it, while other 
equipment such as searchlight engines, water towers and air compres- 
sors, have one or two men assigned to them specifically and are used 
as part of the battalion equipment. 

There are approximately three times as many engine companies as 
there are truck companies. At present there are 48 of the former 
and 18 of the latter in the citywide system. The engine company is 
the principal fire fighting agency. The normal equipment of an en- 
gine company is a pumper truck carrying hose, and in some cases an 
extra hose wagon. Truck companies are responsible for ladder trucks 
and rescue equipment not used directly for putting out fires. 

Operations are carried en in the firehouses by three crews or 
shifts, each working five IO-hour day shifts followed by 60 contin- 
uous hours off duty. Since, in times of emergency, all three shifts 
may be called to duty at the same time, the existing facilities for 
housing the men may become extremely overcrowded.* 



*A detailed description and analysis of each firehouse and its facil- 
ities is contained in the Vensanc report, 

8. 




PUBLIC FACILITIES IN THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



EXISTING FIRE HOUSES-1952 



• TO BE CONTINUED* 

TO BE RECONSTRUCTED* 

O TO BE ABANDONED* 

■111 ONE-HALF MILE RADIUS 

SOURCE AS RECOMMENDED III 1 SURVEY OF THE FIRE 
HOUSES OF SAN FRANCISCO." H C VENSANO. 1951 



FIRE 



1 



PLATE 



QAM FDAfvir. I«r. n nFPARTMFNT D F HI T y PI AM N I M fi 



II EXISTING FIRE HOUSES 

Structural Condition 

The oldest firehouse in use in San Francisco was built in 1376. 
The newest was opened in 1951. Between these two extremes every 
condition and age of structure is represented in the firehouse sys- 
tem. Seme of the oldest structures are by no means the worst. Some 
that appear most substantial would be the first to collapse in a 
severe earthquake, 

San Francisco firehouse s are built of frame, of brick, of con- 
crete and of steel and concrete. All the earlier structures are 
either brick or frame. The two most recent structures comply with 
the A-l classification of the 1947 building code and are of steel 
and concrete. 

The frame houses were built, in many cases, as stations for 
horse-drawn equipment. One feature of all these stations, a hay loft 
built across the rear of the building, was removed in many houses 
after automotive equipment replaced the horses. This removal has 
robbed such buildings of their only lateral support . A building with 
no lateral support will collapse in any respectable earthquake. 

According to the Vensano report some of the more substantial 
appearing brick houses do not have enough mortal' in them to keep 
the walls up in a severe earthquake. 

Therefore the appearance of structures has very little to do 
with their relative safety. Some of the most dilapidated buildings 
in appearance have been given what amounts to a clean bill of health 

9. 



by Mr. Vensano--the recommendation that they be continued in use — 
while structures that seem fit and sturdy conceal the fact that they 
are dangerous to the lives of the men they harbor as long as there is 
the threat of an earthquake in this area. This creates a somewhat 
anomalous situation. Some buildings that in point of years in ser- 
vice would seem to have long since lost their usefulness are found 
to be in much better condition than some erected in the late 20' s and 
early 30' s. 

Since a firehouse is, in some respects, a reflection of civic 
pride and self-interest, San Francisco would do well to think in 
terms of a fairly speedy replacement of almost its entire system, for 
the majority of those that are not actually unsafe have not been given 
proper maintenance and are substandard in design or inappropriately 
located. 
Factors in the Location of Existing Firehouses 

The use of horses had a great deal to do with the location of 
certain fire stations, namely the so-called ;t hilltop rt houses. The 
hilltop location of these early houses made possible a quick get-away 
for horses and equipment, while the more time-consuming up-hill pull 
was only necessary on the return trip. Even though automotive equip- 
ment can negotiate almost all of the grades in San Francisco, topo- 
graphic features cannot be dismissed entirely in the location of new 
facilities, especially where hills or gullies interrupt the street 
pattern and require long detours. 

The distribution of existing firehouses in San Francisco, as 
shown on Plate I, is roughly proportional to the density of population 
in any particular area of the city. But it also may reflect the way 

10. 



an area is built and occupied. Older sections of the city where a 
large percentage of the buildings are of wood and are occupied by 
more than one or two families present a greater fire hazard than areas 
with dwellings, even rows of dwellings, with only one or two families 
in each. Areas of congestion, areas with a great number of tall build- 
ings even though built of fire resistant materials, and areas where 
manufacturing is carried on or where goods are stored, need a greater 
measure of protection and more and different kinds of special fire- 
fighting equipment than low-density residential districts. 

These factors have influenced the location of the existing sys- 
tem of firehouses. But it is also true that the present system is the 
result of a long history. The conditions or circumstances that dic- 
tated the location of a station at one time in most cases have little 
validity today. Thus the introduction of new kinds of equipment, 
shifts in population distribution and changes in the land use pattern, 
and changes in standards of firehouse design and the housing of the 
men have left San Francisco with a firehouse system that is a product 
of history, but that only in its most recent additions is in conform- 
ity with current standards. 

The selection of a firehouse site fifty years ago involved an 
animal's ability to pull a piece of equipment up or down a steep hill. 
However, more recent locations have been influenced by this obsolete 
criteria simply because these more recent structures have had to be 
located in relation to the older ones. If the original site was a 
good one for other and still valid reasons, all is well, but today this 
is not always the case. Also, the rate of speed of a horse pulling a 
piece of fire-fighting equipment influenced the spacing of houses in 

11. 



certain areas. Needless to say a modern engine will change this rate 
enough to permit a different and wider spacing. 
Status of Existing Firehouses 

Plate I and Table I accompanying this chapter show the existing 
system of firehouses and the recommendations made in the Vensano re- 
port concerning each. 

There are fifty -two addresses listed here. Of these, 13 houses 
were constructed either in 1905 or previous to that year; 28 houses 
were built between 1907 and 1926; and 11 houses have been built since 
1927, Of the houses built in or before 1906, 9 should be abandoned 
and 4 have been found in sufficiently good condition to be continued 
in use. The oldest sound structure is Engine Company ,f 15 at 2150 
California Street, This building was built in 1864. 

In the second group, built in the years 1907 to 1926, 12 houses 
are recommended for abandonment and 16 either for repairs, further 
study or continuance in use. The most recently built of this group, 
Engine Company #16 at 909 Tennessee Street, dating from 1926, is 
reconmended for abandonment. 

Of the eleven in the last group, built since 1927, two are recom- 
mended for abandonment. One of these, built in 1928, is in the path 
of the Bay shore Freeway now under construction; the other, a 1935 
addition to an earlier structure will, of necessity, come down if the 
rest of the building comes down as recommended, 

A remarkable number of houses in the newest group need repairs of 
one sort or another. In fact, only three houses in the whole group 
of recent structures are recommended to be continued in use without 
some significant repairs. Two of these three were built in the last 

12, 



two years. 

In all, 23 houses are in such poor condition or are of such 
faulty construction that they must be abandoned. Seventeen houses 
need repairs to make them completely safe under all conditions. On.ly 
11 houses in the entire system are in such good condition that they 
need few or no repairs and may be safely continued in use. Some of 
these are not properly located. 

The largest number of obsolete and dangerous houses is in Divi- 
sion II, where S of 17 houses were found to be unsafe or completely 
obsolete. This is not surprising, as Division II contains those 
older parts of the city that were not destroyed in the earthquake and 
fire of 1906. In Division I, 6 of 15 houses must be abandoned and 
in the outlying Division III, 8 houses out of 20 are unsafe. 



13. 



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Ill PRINC IPLES APPLIED T O THE LOCATION OF NEW FIRE HOUSES 

For planning purposes the Department of City planning has di- 
vided the city into 12 community districts, or living areas, and four 
working districts. It is within the framework of these community and 
working districts, as study areas, that a probable population density 
and holding capacity has been forecast as a basis for projecting in- 
dustrial, commercial and institutional land area requirements as well 
as school, recreational, park, and other public facility requirements. 

Several principles have been set forth as guides for preparing 
the general plan for firehouse location and for future use in evalu- 
ating specific sites when they are selected. The principles are 
underlined below, 

1 • I n general, firehous e s should be distributed throughout the 
city so that each firehouse has a primary service area extending 
within a radius of one-half mil e. T his sp a_cing sh ould vary in rela- 
tion to population dens it ies, buildin g l r.tensit ie s and types of con- 
struction, the pattern of braff icways, and with the relative degree 
of fire-hazard. 

In general, a primary service area extending within a radius of 
one-half mile from each firehouse is the standard used in San Fran- 
cisco by the Fire Department. Strictly observed this would provide 
San Francisco with as manv firehouse s as there are square miles within 
the city limits, or approximately 44 in all. However, such even 
spacing of facilities v«ould not be appropriate in every case, since 
the high-density central areas require a closer spacing and the out- 

16. 



lying low-density areas need net have so concentrated a spacing, par- 
ticularly where the street pattern is unimpaired. Thus the one -half 
mile radius may be used only as a very general standard while other 
conditions will tend to be more decisive. 

Service area boundaries for each firehouse, represented by the 
number of fire boxes to which they respond on a first alarm, overlap 
for eacn box with two other companies, for three companies respond 
to each first alarm. Normally these are the three companies nearest 
the point of the alarm. But, in every case, other companies are 
assigned in a strict order to fill in if any one of the companies in 
prior order is engaged elsewhere. 

Because of this type of operation, service area boundaries can- 
not be made for firehouses in the same manner as the normal service 
area of a school, playground or library. Thus the community district 
boundaries of the Land Use Plan, although they are useful in deter- 
mining the relative amount of coverage in each community, do not in 
any way limit the area that the companies included within them will 
serve in the coarse of even normal activity. As stated in Chapter I, 
each company and each piece of equipment is a city-wide facility. 

The most obvious correlation between the Land Use Section of the 
Master Plan and the location of firehouses is in the matter of popu- 
lation densities. Where high population densiti3S exist or where they 
are projected, a greater measure of fire protection is needed. Con- 
versely, where areas are and will continue to be devoted to low- 
density residential use, fire protection facilities need not be so 
concentrated. 

The extent of the central commercial and industrial areas is also 
projected in the Master Plan, This too helps determine firehouse re- 

17. 



quirements in certain areas. In like manner, concentrations of in- 
stitutional uses, hospitals, schools, recreational centers, outlying 
commercial centers, and other high -value building groups have a bear- 
ing on the future location of fire fighting equipment. 

2 . Firehouses should be located on streets close to and leading 
into major or secondary thoroughfares. 

In the matter of site selection, the Fire Department has very 
specifically stated a preference for locating houses not directly on 
major thoroughfares where traffic is heavy, but on streets close to 
and leading into a major cr secondary thoroughfare. In this way there 
is less conflict with moving traffic when fire equipment leaves the 
house, and a safer entrance into the main stream of traffic is made 
at the intersection. 

The Trafficways Plan, a part of the Transportation Section of the 
Master Flan, designates the streets that will comprise the city -wide 
system of major and secondary thoroughfares. Development and improve- 
ment of these thoroughfares by widening, repaving and traffic control 
measures will facilitate traffic movement. Development of the free- 
way system, however, will create barriers for short -distance move- 
ments in some existing service areas where freeways will interrupt 
existing streets. Obviously, these are factors which have a strong 
bearing on the wise selection of firehouse sites. 

3. Firehouses should be so located that no topographic barriers 
require time-consuming; detours within the primary s ervice area of each 
firehouse. 

Topographic considerations that influence the siting of fire- 
houses are still of some importance in this city of hills, although 
not so important as formerly. Modern fire engines can negotiate all 

18. 



of the steep hills of the city, although not at top speeds, but where 
streets are closed to vehicular traffic because of their excessive 
grades, as in Pacific Heights and parts of the Mission and Potrero, 
time-consuming detours are made necessary if sites are not carefully 
chosen. 

The principal land barrier in the city is the ridge dominated by 
Mount Sutro, Twin Peaks, and Diamond Heights running north and south 
at the geographic center of the city. At present there are only two 
thoroughfares connecting the east and west sections of the city south 
of Judah Street and north of Monterey Boulevard, a distance of over a 
mile. Golden Gate Park represents a barrier on the east-west axis, 
and the Pinelake gulch immediately north of Sloat Boulevard, between 
Nineteenth Avenue and 34th Avenue cuts off the Sunset from the area 
around Lake Merced. Other barriers exist in and around John McLaren 
Park, at the crest of Bernal Heights, and on the eastern side of 
Telegraph Hill. 

Normally, service areas will not overlap when they occur on 
either side of one of these major barriers, and certainly areas on one 
side of a barrier should not be entirely dependent on fire fighting 
equipment located on the opposite side, even though this may be only 
a few blocks away as the crow flies. 

4. Firehouses should be located in or near areas of relatively 
high population densities or ad.jacent to commercial areas where the 
normal activity on the streets is greater than that occurring on a 
residential access street in a low-density area. 

Within each community district in the crlty there are sections 
with varied population densities. By locating firehouses in or near 
those areas that have or are destined to have a higher population 

19. 



density, a rational pattern can be formed for each community. The 
areas that are most susceptible to multiple conflagrations are close 
at hand for at least one company, or two if the house accommodates 
two. The areas where there is less chance of a sudden violent spread 
of fire may be near but sometimes at the perimeter of the one-half 
mile service radius. 

Locating a firehouse on a quiet residential street is apt to 
bring about some resistance from the adjacent home owners. Answering 
a fire call is a noisy operation which is not confined neatly into 
the wakeful hours of day. Where possible, firehouses should be loca- 
ted in the vicinity of commercial areas or in higher density con- 
centrations, where the normal activity on the streets and in the 
buildings has created a greater tolerance among the dwellers for sud- 
den and loud noises than normally prevails in entirely residential 
sections of single or two-family houses. 

One concept that has been advanced in recent years is that fire- 
houses where possible should be combined with or located in proximity 
to police stations and made a part of a community service complex. 
The argument for such an arrangement is based on oossible economies 
and conveniences resulting from the centralization of public facil- 
ities into "centers" and perhaps upon a certain rather arbitrary- 
desire to group together similar things of a public nature. However, 
fire stations are more generously distributed around the city than 
police stations and their location is partly determined by their 
availability to a type of need and emergency that is best answered 
by the quick arrival on the scene of men and equipment. If public 
land is available in a location that is in other respects suitable, 
and an opportuni&y preserts itself for the combination of public 

20. 



facilities that would not be conflicting, it should be selected. 
Other factors, described in this chapter, lead toward the independent 
siting of firehouses. 

Some cities, of a lower population class than San Francisco, 
have consolidated their police and fire services into a department 
of public safety. However, in San Francisco as in ether cities of 
its population class, the two departments are complex and specialized 
and hence quite dissimilar in the type of service rendered and in the 
manner of their operations. Consolidation of the functions into one 
department seems extremely unlikely of being given serious considera- 
tion during the future period for which this plan is proposed. 

5. Firehouse sites should be of sufficient size to allow pro- 
vision of adequate sleeping, eating, and recreational space for the 
total number of men to be housed at any one time . 

The actual amount of space that a fire station should occupy 
must be governed to a great extent by the character of the area and 
value of the land where a given station is located. Of the existing 
firehouses almost all but the two mo so modern are on extremely 
cramped sites. Even one of the largest and most modern houses, on 
Sanchez Street, is overcrowded because of the number of companies and 
corps that occupy it at present. 

In terms of overcrowding and lack of proper facilities and ac- 
commodations for the men, a great number of the existing houses are 
substandard. The Vensano report reveals that not only are sleeping 
quarters minimal or far below standard in many cases, but kitchen 
facilities and toilet and shower accommodations are often primitive 
and sometimes hazardous. 

As the Fire Department is on a twenty-four hour alert, it is not 

21. 



possible during hours of duty for men to leave the firehouse for eat- 
ing, sleeping or any other purpose than that of answering an alarm. 
Thus, new firehouse s should be designed to provide adequate sleeping, 
cooking and eating, sanitary, recreational and gymnastic facilities. 
In outlying areas at least two normal city lots are the absolute 
minimum for the proper housing of men and equipment. Firehouses in 
congested areas might be three or more stories in height, particularly 
wnere available sites are narrow, rather than the usual two. 

In summary, there are two major factors that will affect the 
location of firehouses. First is the general physical configuration 
of the entire city, its topography, relative population densities, 
trends in growth, the character of development, types of land use, 
and its trafficways system. The second factor is the firehouse 
itself in relation to its immediate environment, the amount of land 
it is to occupy, the adjacent pattern of land use, and the adjacent 
pattern of major thoroughfares and minor streets. Balancing these 
factors is the city planning problem involved in uhe location of any 
public facility. 



22. 




PUBLIC FACILITIES IN THE MASTER PLAN OF SAN FRANCISCO 

PROPOSED LOCATIONS OF FIRE HOUSES 

FIRE 



o 


EXISTING FIRE HOUSE TO BE CONTINUED IN USE 


e 


SITE ACQUIRED 


Q 


EXISTING SITE. NEW FIRE HOUSE 


• 


NEW LOCATION 


■mm 


ONE-HALF MILE RADIUS 



2 



PLATE 



IV RECOMMENDED PLAN FOP, THE LOCATION OF FIREHOUSE S 

The plan for the location of firehouses here recommended pro- 
poses a system of 46 firehouses to serve San Francisco. Of this 
total, new general sites are recommended for 20 firehouses. (See 
Table II. ) Four additional new sites have already been acquired. 
Twenty-nine sites are either scheduled or recommended for abandonment. 
The sale of these sites probably will offer funds equal to, if not 
greater, than the amount needed for new sites (See Table III). 

Thirteen buildings and sites are recommended for continued use, 
■chough some will require reconstruction, and nine sites are recom- 
mended for retention and the construction of new buildings. Of these 
nine buildings, six are structurally safe, according to the Venaano 
survey, but are so old and poorly maintained, and so substandard in 
design, that their replacement would remove a spot of incipient 
blight from the blocks in which they are located. 

Each new location recommended is an essential part of a system 
that would provide an even distribution of facilities and each rep- 
resents a feasible location in relation to both city planning and 
fire department principles as described in Chapter III. 

The new sites recommended are general rather than precise: in 
most cases alternative specific sites at a general location are read- 
ily available. Wherever consistent with tne plan as a whole, loca- 
tions have been recommended where sites in public ownership can be 
obtained. Where this has not been feasible, in order to minimize the 
displacement of private values locations have been recommended, where 

possible, where vacant sites are available, 

23. 



Although the plan will be carried out in stages, it is strongly- 
recommended that vacant sites be acquired immediately even if not re- 
quired for construction until a second or third stage in the develop- 
ment program. In some areas of the city where vacant sites do exist 
they are so few in number and subject to being built upon, that it 
would be an economy in the long run to acquire such needed sites now. 

The following description of the forty-six sites in the recom- 
mended plan is listed geographically by community districts and work- 
ing districts, ranging in a clock-wise pattern from the Outer Richmond 
District to the Sunset District and from the Downtown Working District 
to the Bayshore Working District. 

Priorities for effectuating the plan are not indicated since 
determination of a stage program for site acquisition and construction 
is the primary responsibility of the Fire Department. 
Community 1 - Outer Richmond 

1. 449 - 41st Avenue at Point Lobos (Point Lobos). Engine 47. 
It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano report 
recommended reconstruction of the building, built in 1929. 

2. 551 - 26th Avenue near Geary Boulevard (Richmond). Engine 36, 
Truck 14. 

This is one of the buildings recommended in this report for re- 
placement, although found to be structurally safe by the Vensano 
survey. The building was built in 1905. 
Community 2 - Richmond 

3. 441 - 12th Avenue near Geary Boulevard (Park-Presidio). Engine 46. 
It is recommended that this sdte be kept. The Vensano report rec- 
ommends continued use of this building, built in 1913, 



24. 



4. New site: Presidio Avenue at Euclid (Laurel Kill). 

This site would replace the firehouse at 3767 Sacramento Street, 
housing Engine 26 and Truck 10, recommended for abandonment by 
the Vensano survey. The site is within the block of city-owned 
land bounded by Presidio Avenue, Euclid Avenue, and the extension 
of Masonic Avenue to Pine Street. 
Community 3 - Marina 

5. 2239 Greenwich Street near Fillmore (Marina). Engine 20, Truck 16. 
It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano survey rec- 
ommended replacement of the building, built in 1938. 

Community 4 - Downtown 

6. New site: Union and Larkin Streets (Russian Hill). 

This site would replace the firehouse at 1648 Pacific Avenue, 
housing Engine 8 and Truck 4, recommended for reconstruction by 
the Vensano survey. Since the house at 1088 Green Street has al- 
ready been abandoned, and since the Pacific Avenue site is in the 
probable right-of-way of the Central Freeway, a new site at this 
location will insure permanent maximum coverage for the western 
Russian Hill area. 

7. New site: Pine and Larkin Streets (Nob Hill). 

This site would replace the firehouse at 1067 Post Street, hous- 
ing Engine 3 and Truck 3, recommended for reconstruction by the 
Vensano survey. The existing Post Street site is small, and is 
situated on what will be a major one-way street connecting with 
the Central Freeway. The recommended location will provide better 
spacing for this area in relation to the Russian Hill site at 
Union and Larkin Streets (#6 above) and the Civic Center site 
(#3°' below). In addition it will make feasible the abandonment 

25. 



of the firehouse at 1325 Leavenworth near Clay, housing Engine 41. 
This building is recommended for abandonment by the Vensano report. 

8. 1814 Stockton Street near Greenwich (Telegraph Hill). Engine 28. 
It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano survey 
recommended reconstruction of the building, built in 1913, 

9. 1340 Powell Street near Broadway (North Beach). Engine 31, 
Truck 2. 

It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano survey 
recommended further study and repairs for this building, built in 
1916. 
Community 5 - Western Addition 

10. 2150 California Street at Laguna (Lafayette Square). Engine 15. 
It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano survey 
recommended that this building, built in 1884, be continued in 
use. This building is worthy of being preserved as an example 
of Victorian civic architecture at its best. It is a high spir- 
ited gothic adaptation with the symbols of the corps, fire hats 
and hydrants, sprouting from the pinnacles and the gables. Such 
a handsome building might ultimately and ideally serve as a 
museum of fire department lore and history. The building is in 
excellent structural condition. 

11. New Site: McAllister and Scott Streets (Western Addition). 

This site would replace the firehouse at 1145 Ellis Street, hous- 
ing Engine 34, recommended for abandonment by the Vensano survey. 

12. New Site: Turk and Stanyan Streets (Lone Mountain). 

This site would replace the firehouse at 2135 Geary Street, hous- 
ing Truck 5, recommended for abandonment by the Vensano survey. 
It would also replace the firehouse at 1152 Oak Street, housing 

26. 



Engine 21. Vacant sites are available in this vicinity. 

Also recommended by the Vensano report for abandonment in 
the Western Addition community area is a firehouse at 
3022 Washington Street, built in 1893, and housing Engine 
23. The plan here recommended provides for no replace- 
ment of this facility. The company could thus be trans- 
ferred to a new site where no service is presently pro- 
vided. 
Community 6 - Twin Peaks-Buena Vista 

13. New site: Clayton Street at Frederick (Buena Vista). 

This site would replace the firehouse at 1249 Clayton Street, 
housing Engine 40, and the firehouse at 1757 Waller Street, hous- 
ing Truck 12, both of which have been recommended for abandonment 
by the Vensano report. A site on or adjacent to the publicly 
owned property at the portal of the Sunset Tunnel would be 
feasible. 

14. 135 Sanchez Street near Market (Eureka Valley). Engine 27, 
Truck 6. 

Completed in 1950, it is recommended that this facility be con- 
tinued in use. 

15. New site: "West slope of Twin Peaks (Twin Peaks). 

This site would replace the firehouse at 100 Hoffman Street hous- 
ing Engine 24, when the western slopes of Twin Peaks and Mount 
Sutro are developed. A site near the Sutro Reservoir and the 
eastern edge of the Laguna Honda Home, south of Clarendon Avenue, 
would provide good coverage for the nev/ residential developments 
as well as for the existing institutional uses. 



27. 



Community 7 - Mission 

16. 3816 - 22nd Street (Dolores Heights). Engine 44. 

It is recommended that this hilltop site be kept, or an equiva- 
lent site be acquired. The Vensano survey recommended abandon- 
ment of the building. 

17. New Site: Thirty-first Street near "Street A r ' (Diamond Heights). 
This site, indicated in both the Preliminary Redevelopment Plan 
and the Tentative Redevelopment Plan for the Diamond Heights 
Project Area, will serve the Diamond Heights and Glen Park 
neighborhoods which are presently not covered. 

18. New site: Guerrero Street at San Jose Avenue (Guerrero) 

This site would replace the firehouse at 1458 Valencia Street, 
housing Engine 13, which has been recommended for abandonment 
by the Vensano survey. It would also replace the firehouse at 
315 Duncan Street, housing Truck 11, also recommended for aban- 
donment. A site on widened Guerrero Street near San Jose Ave- 
nue is geographically desirable since it is close to Army Street, 
a major east-west thoroughfare crossing this service area. 
Community 8 - Potrero - Bernal 

19. 194 Park Street at Holly Park (Holly Park). Engine 32, 

It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano survey 
recommends reconstruction of the building. 
Community 9 - Bay shore 

20. 2460 San Bruno Avenue near Silver (Portola). Engine 42. 

It is recommended that this site be kept. This is one of the 

buildings recommended for replacement , although found to be 

structurally safe by the Vensano survey. The building was built 

in 1912. 

28, 



21. New Site: Revere Avenue at Keith (Bayview), 

This site would replace the firehouse at 1632 Oakdale Avenue, 
housing Engine 11 and Truck 17, recommended for abandonment by 
the Vensano survey. This recommended site, east of Third Street, 
is better situated to serve the Bayview and Hunters Point neigh- 
borhoods than the Oakdale site which is west of Third Street and 
on a designated major thoroughfare. 

22. New Site: Leland Avenue near Alpha (Visitacion Valley). 
This site would replace the firehouse at 1298 Girard Street, 
housing Engine 18, recommended for reconstruction by the Vensano 
survey. The site here recommended would provide better coverage 
of the rapidly developing Visitacion Valley residential and 
industrial areas, particularly in relation to the plan as a 
whole, 

23. New site: Earl Street near Gilman and the Hunters Point Express- 
way (Candlestick Point). 

This site, presently under water is projected to serve the 
Candlestick Point area and adjacent tidelands when developed. 
Community 10 - Outer Mission 

24. 724 Brazil Street (Outer Mission). Engine 43. 

It is recommended that this site be expanded or an equivalent 
site be acquired. The firehouse, built in 1912, is substandard 
in space and design, although the Vensano report recommended 
continued use. 
Community 11 - West of Twin Peaks 

25. 2098 San Jose Avenue (Balboa Park). Engine 38, 

Since this firehouse is recommended for reconstruction by the 

29. 



Vensano survey, an alternate site, on public land, a few blocks 
west on Ocean Avenue near the new City College transit terminal, 
can also be considered to serve the Ingleside, San Miguel, West- 
wood, and Sunnyside neighborhoods, 

26. 117 Broad Street near Plymouth (Ocean Mew). Engine 33. 
This is one of the buildings recommended in this report for 
replacement, although found to be structurally safe by the Ven- 
sano survey. The building was built in 1896; the site is only 
25 feet wide and should be expanded. 

27. 1091 Portola Drive at Miraloma (Mt. Davidson). Engine 39, 
Truck 15. It is recommended that this site be kept. The Ven- 
sano survey recommended abandonment of the building. 

28. New site: Winston Drive at Buckingham (Lake Merced). 

This site, already acquired, will serve the Stone stown, Lakeside, 
Lakeshore, Merced Manor and Parkmerced neighborhoods presently 
beyond the 1/ 2-mile service radius of a firehouse. 
Community 12 - Sunset 

29. New site: Kirkham Street at Sixteenth Avenue (Sunset Heights). 
This site would replace the firehouse at 1348 Tenth Avenue, 
housing Engine 22, recommended for abandonment by the Vensano 
survey. The recommended site is more centrally situated within 
the service area of this firehouse, 

30. 2155 - 18th Avenue near Rivera (Parkside). Engine 49, 

It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano survey 
recommends reconstruction of the building, built in 1931. 

31. 1935 - 32nd Avenue near Ortega (Sunset). Engine 30, Truck 18. 
Completed in 1951, it is recommended that this facility be 
continued in use. 

30. 



32. New site: Kirkham Street at 41st Avenue (Seabright). Engine 45. 
This site would replace the firehouse at 1348 - 4fith Avenue, 
housing Engine 45, recommended for abandonment by the Vensano 
survey. The recommended site is more centrally situated within 
the service area of this firehouse.. 

33. New site: 42nd Avenue at Taraval (Taraval). 

This site will serve the southwestern section of the Sun3bt com- 
munity district presently beyond the l/2-mile service radius of a 
firehouse. There is considerable vacant land in this vicinity. 
A site presently owned but not used by the Fire Department on 
44th Avenue near Vicente would not provide as good coverage of 
the area. 
Working Area W - Downtown 

34. New site: Davis Street near Broadway (Waterfront). 

This site would replace the firehouse at 115 Drumm Street, hous- 
ing Engine 12 and Truck 13, recommended by the Vensano survey for 
abandonment. The new site should be located north of the exist- 
ing wholesale produce market area, yet free of conflict with 
potential Embarcadero Freeway ramps, 

35. 460 Bush Street near Kearny (Financial). Engine 2, 

It is recommended that this site be continued in use. The Ven- 
sano survey recommends emergency reconstruction of the building, 

36. 416 Jessie Street near Fifth (Downtown). Engine 17, Truck 1. 
It is recommended that this site be continued in use. The Ven- 
sano survey recommends some reconstruction of the building. 

37. New site: Civic Center. 

This site would replace the firehouse at 1051 McAllister Street, 

31. 



housing Engine 14. The Vensano survey recommends abandonment of 
the structure, the oldest still in use, A Civic Center site will 
provide a better spacing of firehcuses in the total plan. The 
Fire Department is presently assigned a site at the corner of 
McAllister and Polk Streets for a combined firehouse and head- 
quarters building. A restudy and expansion of the Civic Center 
plan may make an alternative site in the Civic Center more desir- 
able. 

Also recommended for abandonment in the Downtown Area is the 
firehouse at 451 Pacific Avenue, housing Engine 1. The plan 
here recommended provides for no replacement of this facil- 
ity. 
Working Area X - South of Market 

38. New site: Beale Street near Harrison (Rincon Hill), 

This site would replace the facility at the foot of Harrison 
Street on State Harbor Board property presently housing Engine 
9 and Fireboat 1. Since the State Harbor Board is going to take 
over the operation of the fireboat system, this new inland site 
would provide better service to the adjacent industrial area. 

39. 676 Howard Street near New Montgomery. Engine 4. 

It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano survey 
recommended reconstruction of the building. 

40. 356 Seventh Street near Harrison (Columbia Square). Engine 6. 

It is recommended that this site be kept. The existing firehouse 
should be replaced, 

41. 36 Bluxome Street near Fourth (Industrial). Engine 35, Truck 8. 
It is recommended that this site be kept. The Vensano survey 

32. 



recommended continued use of this building, built in 1939, 

42. New site: 19th and Folsom Streets. (Drill Tower). 

This site, already acquired, will house Engine 10 and Truck 7, 
presently housed in a building recommended for abandonment by 
the Vensano survey at 3050 - 17th Street. It will also house 
the Fire Drill Tower, displaced from its Division Street site 
by the Bayshore Freeway, 

Also recommended for abandonment in the South-of -Market - 
Mission area is the firehouse at 3160 - 16th Street. The 
plan here recommended provides for no replacement of this 
f acil ity . 

43. New site: 16th Street at Vermont. (Potrero). 

This site, already acquired, will house Engine 29, displaced 
from its site at 380 Division Street by the Bayshore Freeway 
now under construction. 
Working:: Area Y - Potrero 

44. New site: 20th and Indiana Streets (Potrero Hill), 

This site will replace the firehouse at 909 Tennessee Street, 
housing Engine 16. The Vensano survey recommended abandonment 
of this building. The site on Tennessee Street is in the pro- 
bable right-of-way of the Embarcadero Freeway and Southern 
Crossing approach. It is therefore suggested that the new 
firehouse be located west of the existing site. 

Recommended for abandonment in this plan is the firehouse 
at 1300 Fourth Street, housing Engine 19. No replacement 
of this site is proposed. Also recommended for abandon- 
ment in this plan is the firehouse at 748 Wisconsin Street 

33. 



on Potrero Hill, housing Engine 48. The sites recommended 
above will give adequate coverage of both industrial and 
residential sections of this area. 
Working Area Z - Bay shore 

45. New site: Evans Avenue at Napoleon Street. (Islais Creek). 
This site would replace the firehouse at 2501 - 25th Street, 
housing Engine 37, and Truck 9. The Vensanu survey recommended 
reconstruction of the building, but it is here recommended that 
the site be replaced since it is situated on a dead-end street 
as a result of the Bay shore Freeway construction. 

46. New Site: Arthur Avenue and Jennings Street (Hunters Point). 
This site, presently under water, is projected to serve Hunters 
Point and the adjacent tidelands to the north when filled. It 
would then replace the house at 3305 Third Street, recommended 
for reconstruction by the Vensano survey. 



34. 



TABLE II: NEW PIREIIOUSE SITES RECOMIENDED 



NEW SITES 



FORMER LOCATION OR 
REPLACEMENT 



1, Presidio Avenue at Euclid 



2. Union and Larkin Streets 



3. Pine and Larkin Streets 



4. McAllister 6c Scott Streets 



5. Turk Street at Parker 



6, Clayton Street at Frederick 



7» West Slope of Twin Peaks 

8. Diamond Haights 

9, Guerrero Street at San Jone 



10 « Revere Avenue at Keith 

11. Leland Avenue near Alpha 

12. Earl Street near Gilman 

13. Kirkham Street at 16th Ave. 

14. Kir khan; Street at 41st A.ve. 



Engine 26 & Truck 10 
3767 Sacramento Street 

Engine 6 & TrucK 4 
1648 Pacific Avenue 

Engine 3 & Truck 3 
1067 Post Street 

Engine 34 

1145 Ellis Street 

Engine 21 

1152 Oak Street 

Truck 5 

2136 Geary Street 

Fngine 40 

1249 Clayton Street 

Truck 12 

1757 Waller Street 

Engine 24 

100 Hoffman Street 



Engine 13 

1458 Valencia Street 

Truck 11 

315 Duncan Street 

Engine 11 & Truck 17 
1632 Oakdale Avenue 

Engine 18 

1293 Girard Street 



Engine 22 

1348 Tenth Avenue 

Engine 45 

1318 - 46th Avenue 



35, 



15. 42d Avenue at Taraval 

16. Davis Street near Broadway 

17. Beale Street near Harrison 

18. 20th and Indiana Streets 
19 • Evans Avenue at Napoleon 
20. Arthur Avenue at Jennings 



Engine 12 & Truck 15 
115 Drumm Street 
Engine 1 
451 Pacific Avenue 

Engine 9 

Foot of Harrison Street 

Engine 16 

909 Tennessee Street 

Engine 37 & Truck 9 
2501 - 25th Street 



36, 



TABLE III 

EXISTING PIREHOUSE SITES RECOMMENDED 

FOR ABANDONMENT, AND APPRAISED VALUE OF LAND 



















Ls 




















ind 


Engine Co. # 1 








451 


Pacific Avenue 




$ 6, 


250 




1 #12, 


Truck 


#13 


115 


Drumm Street 




45, 


000 




' # 3, 


1! 


# 


3 


1067 


Post Street 




20, 


000 




' # 8 3 


it 


# 


4 


1648 


Pacific Avenue 




7, 


500 




' #31 








1088 


Green Street 




8, 


250 




1 #34 








1145 


Ellis Street 




5, 


500 




1 #41 








1325 


Leavenworth Street 




6, 


000 




1 # 9 


F.B. 


# 


1 


Foot 


of Harrison Street 


(Stat 


e Property) 




1 #19 








1300 


- 4th Street 




67, 


700 




' # 5 








2136 


Geary Street 




4, 


000 




' #14 








1051 


McAllister Street 




10, 


000 




' #23 








5022 


Washington Street 




5, 


600 


Truck ' 


' #12 








1757 


Waller Street 




3, 


000 


Engine ' 


1 #21 








1152 


Oak Street 




3 3 


500 




' #40 








1249 


Clayton Street 




5, 


000 




' # 7 








3160 


- 16th Street 




8, 


500 




1 #10, 


Truck 


# 


7 


3050 


- 17th Street 




20, 


000 




' #29 








380 


Division Street 


(State 


Property) 




1 #26, 


Truck 


#10 


3767 


Sacramento Street 




7, 


000 


tt i 


» #45 








1343 


- 45th Avenue 




3, 


500 


it i 


' #18 








1298 


Girard Street 




6, 


000 


Truck ' 


' #11 








315 


Duncan Street 




6, 


000 



37. 



TABLE III (continued) 



Land 



Engine Co. 


#13 


ti ti 


#24 


tt !! 


#11 


If II 


#16 


II It 


#25 


II II 


#37 


II II 


#48 


It It 


#22 



1459 Valencia Street $ 4,000 

100 Hoffman 5,000 

Truck #17 1632 Oakdale Avenue 5,000 

909 Tennessee Street 5,000 

3305 - 3rd Street (State Property) 

#37, Truck # 9 2501 - 25 bh Street 9,000 

748 Wisconsin Street 5,000 

1348 - 10th Avenue 4,500 



$285,800 



Source: Valuation of Real Property Owned by City and County of 
San Francisco, January 1, 1952, E. J. Riordan, Director 
of Property. 



38.